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What is an Organic Mattress

By Pradeepa_CML

WHAT IS AN ORGANIC MATTRESS?

Organic mattresses are defined as:

A mattress made by Nature, grown from the ground, a living, breathing thing … constructed TOTALLY from NATURAL materials and without the use of pesticides. It is naturally biodegradable, safe for you and the planet.

NO synthetic materials such as polyester, polyethylene foam, or PVC. Having not been treated with chemical fire retardants

Complying with USDA standards defining all materials composing the product — for example cotton wool and latex

True Organic latex mattresses are made from organic latex, organic cotton and organic wool. These components are cultivated using NO pesticides and are refined/manufactured using chemical-free processes.

Organic mattresses use organic wool as a fire retardant to meet Federal 1633 fire retardant regulations.

Organic latex wool and cotton mattresses are hypoallergenic, antimicrobial, and biodegradable.

Organic mattresses are characterized by their ability to support the body and alleviate pressure, while simultaneously regulating body temperature to help you sleep warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer.

Benefits of an Organic Latex Mattresses

  • Chemical Free

  • Hypo-Allergenic

  • Regulates Temperature

  • Durability

  • Sustainable and Biodegradable

  • Extreme Support and Minimal Pressure

  • Comfort and Elasticity

  • Naturally Flame Resistant

  • Infant Approved

Hazards of a Conventional Mattresses

  • Chemical Flame Retardants

  • Carcinogenic Chemicals and Pesticides

  • Polyurethane Foam

  • Decreases Respiratory Health

  • Increases Exposure to Allergens

  • Quickly Degrades and Compresses

  • Devastating Environmental Impact

  • Hazardous Production Process

  • Antibiotic Use

Benefits of the components of an Organic Latex Mattress

In general OLMs are made from three components …wool, cotton, and latex rubber; which provide significant benefits not found in synthetic mattresses

The most common question asked at this point is “what is organic latex and how is it different from other latex?”

Natural rubber (latex) is a polymer formed from the milky sap drawn from the Havena Brasilliensis (rubber) tree. Processed using ammonia, salt, sulphur and turpentine. Often vulcanized by heat, pressure and sulphur. Often used to make high quality products like racing tires.

Organic latex is natural rubber drawn from trees unexposed to pesticides and processed only with trace amounts of salt and ammonia. Organic latex is washed at least 3 times to remove allergens/proteins thus it is hypoallergenic.

Synthetic rubber AKA Styrene-Butadiene, is a man-made product produced from two petroleum refinement by products, combined with a caustic soap and further chemically treated. Often blended with other products and vulcanized. Over 70% of rubber products are made from SBR.

OLMs Regulate Temperature

Organic mattress components have an innate ability to regulate body temperature. They stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer. These natural ingredients regulate body temperature by wicking away body moisture. This results in a calmer heart rate due to lower humidity next to the skin, and provide for an optimal skin temperature that allows for a great night’s rest.

In particular, wool is a natural temperature-regulating textile. The American Sleep Industry Association explains how wool is a hygroscopic fiber; it takes up moisture in vapor form. Tiny pores make the fiber semi-permeable, allowing vapor to pass through the heart of the fiber. Wool can easily absorb up to 30% of its weight in moisture without feeling damp or clammy. The capacity to absorb makes wool a ‘temperature regulator’. Wool absorbs perspiration and keeps a layer of dry air next to the skin, which in turn helps to hold in body heat. Furthermore, as wool absorbs moisture, it reacts with molecules and generates heat. On the other hand, wool helps keep the body cool by absorbing perspiration.

Thus, organic wool functions as a natural insulator, helping you feel warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. Because wool is an absorbent fiber that helps regulate body temperature, is comfortable to sleep on year round! When the air is cool and damp, wool absorbs moisture and keeps a layer of dry, insulating air next to the skin. On the other hand, when it is warm, that same absorption capacity takes up perspiration, allowing the body’s natural cooling system to work better. Because of this capacity, beds made with wool don’t develop hot or cold spots, allowing for a better night’s rest, free of tossing and turning.

Chemical Free

Organic latex mattress are manufactured without synthetic chemicals; usualy fron three MATERIALS, WOOL COTTON AND LATEX RUBBER.

Organic wool is EXTRAORDINARILY FINE, SHEARED FROM sheep THAT live on pastures free of pesticides.

Organic cotton is DIFFERENTIATED FROM conventional cotton IN THAT IT IS grown without the use of pesticides, not genetically modified, and zero chemicals are used in the manufacturing process.

Organic latex is grown on plantations that meet federal USDA organic regulations.

ORGANIC MATTRESSES are NOT TREATED WITH carcinogenic flame retardants required to meet the Federal 1633 fire retardant laws. THEY MEET 1633 regulations BY USE OF organic wool, a natural flame retardant.

See Carcinogenic Chemicals and Pesticides and Chemical Flame Retardants for a better understanding of how pesticides and synthetic chemicals are dangerous and how going organic can be beneficial for you and your family.

Hypo-Allergenic

Organic latex DOES NOT CONTAIN the trigger for LCA — AND is recommended for people with allergies and respiratory issues. GENERALLY IN THE CASE OF THE BEDROOM, allergy and respiratory problems are caused by chemical toxins or pesticides that are incorporated in the conventional BEDDING manufacturing process. Organic latex mattresses are pesticide-free, chemical-free, and thus, hypo-allergenic. Mention WASHING

Organic latex mattresses are typically made of organic cotton, organic wool, and organic latex. Organic cotton is pesticide-free, pigment-free, bleach free and hypoallergenic. Organic cotton does not use chemicals in the manufacturing process thus it is less likely to cause allergic reactions in people with chemical sensitivities. Organic cotton contains no heavy metals (which tend to cause allergic reactions) that are typically included in the dyes used to put color and patterns into bedding.

Organic wool mattresses is actually beneficial for people who have “wool” allergies Organic wool in its natural form, wool is 100% hypoallergenic and it resists bacteria, mold, mildew and dust mites. Wool fibers contain scales that act as a self cleaning mechanism and ventilating system that transport moisture and allergens away. Because wool readily releases moisture it does not allow for the damp conditions that mold and dust mites thrive on.

Organic latex is inherently hypo-allergenic, anti-microbial, anti-bacterial, and resistant to water. It is resistant to dust mites, bacteria, fungus, mold, mildew, bedbugs and other allergens. Natural latex has also been proven to increase respiratory health. Together, these three components, organic cotton, organic wool, and organic latex, are combined to create an organic latex mattress that alleviates respiratory ailments and provides a night free of coughing, sneezing and runny noses. With a 100% organic latex mattress, a great night’s rest soon becomes one less problem allergy sufferers have to worry about.

Naturally Flame Resistant

Organic latex mattresses do not require the use of harmful flame retardants because of organic wool. According to the American Sheep Industry Association, wool is the only fiber that is naturally flame resistant. Its main component, a protein called keratin, coupled with the moisture collected in its fibers make it challenging to ignite. Furthermore, the protective Lanolin coating found in wool makes it naturally resistant to combustion. Unlike most artificial fibers, which often melt and stick to the skin when on fire, wool usually only smolders or chars. Although wool will burn under intense fire, it normally self extinguishes when the flame source is removed. The use of organic wool in mattresses prevents the need for chemical flame retardants.

Organic Wool is naturally fire resistant and meets all federal 1633 fire retardant protocols. For a better understanding of the prevalence of chemical flame retardants and their hazards see the following CBS video:http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4109474n&tag=related;photovideo and check out Chemical Fire Retardants.

Antibiotic Use

According to the Organic Trade Association, “two antibiotics, Oxytetracycline and Chlortetracycline, are approved for growth promotion in sheep. These antibiotic feed additives are used to promote slightly faster growth and to compensate for overcrowded and unhealthy conditions in concentrated animal feeding operations. Mounting evidence suggests that widespread use of agricultural antibiotics is contaminating surface waters and groundwater, including drinking water, in many rural areas as a result of their presence in animals waste. This non-human use of antibiotics is compromising medicine’s effectiveness in people as bacteria become resistant to antibiotics over time.” Organic sheep facilities and organic wool production does NOT use any of the methods requiring the use of antibiotics.

Benefits of Organic Latex Mattresses in general

Durability

Organic latex mattresses have a much longer life expectancy than synthetic mattresses due to the buoyancy and density of latex, thus they do not break down as quickly as synthetic foam. Organic latex mattresses are made of materials that are durable, flexible, and long-lasting. Organic wool, for example, is able to be stretched up to 50% when wet and 30% when dry and still bounce back to its original shape when stress is released due to the inherent crimp of wool fiber molecules. The flexibility of wool fibers make them more durable. A wool fiber can be bent more than 20,000 times without breaking. The natural elasticity of wool makes woolen fabrics resistant to tearing. The chemical structure of wool also prevents it from compressing. Like wool, organic cotton is also known for its extreme durability (think about all of your cotton clothes that have lasted forever, and multiply it by an organic growing and manufacturing process that produces dense quilts which are made specifically to last you a lifetime). Mention still in use

Extreme Support and Minimal Pressure

Organic bedding is innately supportive. Organic latex is inherently supportive on the back and spine because it conforms to your body and minimizes pressure points. Organic latex distributes pressure evenly providing for good circulation and a great night’s sleep. Organic wool has an abundance of air spaces between the wool fibers that cushion the body and alleviate pressure points. This helps to support the spine and eventually distribute pressure to allow for a night free of tension and full of REM sleep.

Comfort and Elasticity

Organic latex mattresses are as plush and comfortable as they are healthy for the environment. Organic latex is extremely comfortable because it molds to the body’s natural contours. Its extreme elasticity prevents the organic latex from packing down and compressing like synthetic foams. Because the latex molds to the body, it is also able to isolate motion which prevents disturbances while sleeping. Additionally, the extreme durability and elasticity of organic wool prevents wool fibers from compressing and enables them to bounce back to their original shape, even under extreme pressure.

Infant Approved

Organic latex mattresses are highly recommended for infants. Organic wool is beneficial for babies because of naturally crimping wool fibers that create a cushion that helps cradle and sooth the body. Organic wools natural ability to regulate body temperature helps to keep your baby comfortable and relaxed. Wools innate insulation system helps your baby stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer. These components, coupled with the fact that wool is a natural flame retardant and organic wool is pesticide free, ensures your baby a safe, comfortable, and uninterrupted sleep.

Check out the following video for a better understanding of the prevalence of chemical flame retardants in children’s products, including mattresses. The CBS video concludes that children should not be exposed to these types of chemicals:http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4111704n&tag=related;photovideo

Sustainable and Biodegradable

Organic latex mattresses are both sustainable and biodegradable. The components of organic latex mattresses (organic wool, organic cotton, and organic latex) are renewable and have a low impact on the planet. According to the Organic Trade Association, organic production systems replenish and maintain soil fertility, use natural fertilizers instead of toxic and persistent pesticides and fertilizers, and build biologically diverse agriculture. Therefore, organic growing methods not only maintain soil health but also use fewer natural resources and less land.

Latex extraction is sustainable. The technique for tapping latex from rubber trees eliminates a need to cut down the tree for latex extraction. Latex is extracted by carefully cutting the bark of rubber trees (which heals rapidly) to allow the flow of the white milk-type sap without damaging the tree. Rubber trees can yield latex for as long as 30 years. When the trees are harvested, the land is replanted and the Rubber-wood is used to create furniture. Latex is all-natural, and biodegradable.

Hazards of Conventional Mattresses

Let’s take a quick look at a few conventional mattress types …

Memory Foam is simply poly foam with a gel treatment, memory foam mattresses are a petroleum by-product enhanced with a visco-elastic polymer to give the foam a gell feel and memory. It is a chemical production process that requires further treatment with known carcinogenic compounds to make a memory foam mattress “safe” to sleep on.

Natural Latex is a polymer formed from the milky sap drawn from the Havena Brasilliensis (rubber) tree. Processed using ammonia, salt, sulphur and turpentine. Often vulcanized by heat, pressure and sulphur. Used to make Mattresses by gluing a layer of Natural latex to synthetic foam, covered in polyester fabrics, and treated with toxic flame-retardants.

“AIR Beds” …. an air mattress, with a pump to keep it comfy. Simply a conventional mattress with the springs replaced by air bladders hooked to a pump; covered in polyester fabrics and chemically treated to prevent mold build-up on the bladders

Chemical Flame Retardants

As of July 1st, 2007, mattresses made and sold in the US are required to meet federal Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) flame retardant standards (Mattresses that meet the new fire retardant (FR) regulation must be marked with a label that states they meet “16 CFR Part 1633,”)so that people have more time to get out of their homes in the case of a mattress fire. Some of these chemical flame retardants are toxic and cancer causing. In “Sleeping with Danger”, Bob Segall of NBC Indianapolis interviews Mark Strobel, president of a mattress manufacturing company in southern Indiana. Strobel talks about Boric Acid, a household roach killer that is being added to mattresses to help them pass flammability tests. Strobel states, “”It’s right under the ticking of the mattress in the cotton batting. The labeling tells you to keep it away from children and it’s extremely poisonous, and now we’re putting it in our mattresses…and people are getting sick from these mattresses already.” An increasing number of people are testing positive for large doses of compound chemicals in their systems, including those that sleep on these mattresses, as well as those that make them. Symptoms of such exposure include fatigue, headaches, rashes, skin irritations, sore throats, nose bleeds, bronchitis, coughing and burning sensations.

Dale Guyer, a doctor at the Guyer Institute of Molecular Medicine notes that, “Nobody has done a 20-year study to see what could happen with the compounds in these mattresses. This could be a potential serious health risk for a lot of people and they aren’t even aware of it.” Furthermore, there are no mandatory labeling requirements for mattress manufacturers, so they don’t have to tell you what fire retardant chemicals are in their mattresses. The government claims that this kind of labeling is unnecessary because flame retardant chemicals that are inside of the mattress cannot escape. However, a detailed health assessment conducted by CPSC shows that “antimony [was] released from the [mattress] barrier,” and there were “relatively high releases of boric acid” from inside the mattresses. But overall, the report found the chemicals “are not expected to pose any appreciable risk of health effects to consumers who sleep on treated mattresses.” “But even top officials at the CPSC are not convinced the chemicals are safe. Despite CPSC’s study that found a low risk of health effects from FR chemicals, CPSC acting chairman Nancy Nord recently said she is concerned about FR chemicals and does not want to encourage their use because “the health effects of some of these chemicals are not well-understood.” The CPSC notes that some manufacturers choose to meet flame retardant regulations by using fire resistant natural fibers, such as wool. MAOB uses NO chemical flame retardants on our organic latex mattresses. Instead, we use organic wool to meet 1633 fire retardant regulations. For the complete article, please read: http://www.wthr.com/story/7873623/sleeping-with-danger?redirected=true

Blum, in “Flame-Retardant Additives as Possible Cancer Hazards” argues that chemical flame retardants are a mutagen and should not be used. She states, “Thousands of chemicals to which humans have been exposed have been introduced into the environment without adequate toxicological testing. Recent federal regulations, requiring that children’s sleepwear, mattresses and mattress pads meet flammability standards, are said to have resulted in a decrease in the number of burn injuries and deaths… Currently about 300 million pounds of flame retardant chemicals are being produced. Those added directly to textiles are often present in amounts as high as 10 to 20 percent of the weight of the fabric. Further extension of the scope of the standards may increase their productive and usage even more. Inevitably, some fraction of the many millions of pounds of flame retardants that are being produced will find their way into people.” These chemical flame retardants are already being found in human beings, animals, and the environment.

In “Exposure to Flame Retardants on the Rise”, Paul Webster elaborates how traces of fire retardant chemicals are being discovered in human breast milk. This is worrisome because the potentially harmful chemicals can be transferred from mother to child through breast milk. Webster notes that “concentrations of a potentially toxic class of substances used in flame retardants are three times higher in women’s breast milk in Canada than in the U.K. and Germany, although they are lower than those in the United States”.

In “Is Fire Retardant A Harmful Toxin,” CBS writer Wyatt Andrews reports that the chemical flame retardants that are intended to protect people, may actually cause harm. Two states have already banned flame retardants, and six more are is the process. Andrews reports that hundreds of millions of pounds of flame retardant chemicals have been embedded in our mattresses, our furniture and our clothes over the past 30 years. However, scientists are not raising major concerns about the prevalent brominated flame retardants called PBDE’s. Linda Birnbaum, a senior toxicologist at the EPA says, “I am concerned about developing children, concerned about exposure before you are born,” because PBDEs cause the kind of health effects in young animals that are warning signs for infant humans. “They can affect the developing brain and they can affect the developing reproductive system,” she said. “There is very limited evidence whether or not they can cause cancer.” Deborah Rice, EPA scientist says, “This is concentrating in human beings, just like PCBs.” Andrews notes that, “Unlike other industrial chemicals, brominated flame retardants build up in the human body. And most of what we absorb does not go away.” Check out the full CBS report here: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/05/19/eveningnews/main4109418.shtml?source=search_story and don’t miss this educational video: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4109474n&tag=related;photovideo

Many studies have concluded that flame retardant exposure is harmful for humans, and this exposure is much more widespread than originally thought. Please read the following for more information on chemical flame retardants:

-San Francisco Chronicle: “Study finds flame-retardant chemical in U.S. breast milk”

http://www.sfgate.com/cgibin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/09/23/MN285358.DTL

-San Francisco Chronicle: “Dangerous chemical found in women’s breasts Bay Area levels higher than Europe, Japan”

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/03/12/MN137868.DTL

PBDE’s

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame retardant chemicals used in furniture and bedding foam. The EPA states, “Although use of flame retardants saves lives and property, there have been unintended consequences. There is growing evidence that PBDEs persist in the environment and accumulate in living organisms, as well as toxicological testing that indicates these chemicals may cause liver toxicity, thyroid toxicity, and neurodevelopmental toxicity. Environmental monitoring programs in Europe, Asia, North America, and the Arctic have found traces of several PBDEs in human breast milk, fish, aquatic birds, and elsewhere in the environment. The mechanisms or pathways through which PBDEs get into the environment and humans are not known yet, but could include releases from manufacturing or processing of the chemicals into products like plastics or textiles, aging and wear of the end consumer products, and direct exposure during use (e.g., from mattresses).” More information of PBDE’s can be found:http://www.epa.gov/oppt/pbde/

Furthermore, PBDE’s are so harmful to human health and the environment that Wal-Mart is taking a step beyond federal regulators and is banning the flame retardant in all of its products. This example of ‘retail regulation’ demonstrates how the market is able to move more quickly than the government. If Wal-Mart is banning PBDE’s because of their harmful consequences, all mattress manufactures should as well. Sleeping Organic does not use any PBDE’s in our products. For more on Wal-Mart and PBDE’s, please see the article found here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/25/AR2011022502977.html

CFC’s

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are a class of chemicals that were commonly used as flame retardants in mattresses, until their ban in 1987. The Montreal Protocol banned the use of CFC’s because of their ability to transcend the lower atmosphere and destroy the ozone in the upper atmosphere. CFC’s are harmful greenhouse gases that are persistent in most mattresses made prior to 1987. MAOB products contain NO CFC’s.

PCB’s

PCBs are chemically similar to PBDEs. PCBs are slow to break down, persisting in the environment and accumulating in human and animal fat cells. According to the EPA, “PCBs are man-made organic chemicals known as chlorinated hydrocarbons. PCBs were domestically manufactured from 1929 until their manufacture was banned in 1979. They have a range of toxicity and vary in consistency from thin, light-colored liquids to yellow or black waxy solids. Due to their non-flammability, chemical stability, high boiling point, and electrical insulating properties, PCBs were used in hundreds of industrial and commercial applications including mattresses”. Although PCB’s can no longer be commercially produced in the U.S, PCB’s may still be present in certain products. PCBs are hazardous to the environment, and once released into the environment, PCBs do not readily break down. PCBs also causes adverse effects in human health. The EPA states, “PCBs have been demonstrated to cause cancer, as well as a variety of other adverse health effects on the immune system, reproductive system, nervous system, and endocrine system.” If you are sleeping on a mattress made in or prior to the 80′s, it is plausible that you are sleeping on severely harmful fire retardant chemicals. It might be time for a new mattress! MAOB products contain NO PCB’s. For more information on PCBs see: http://www.epa.gov/osw/hazard/tsd/pcbs/pubs/about.htm

PVCs

Many synthetic beds have plastic coverings made of polyvinyl chloride (PVCs). PVC is one of the most widely used plastics in the U.S. According to Green Peace, the production of PVCs produces toxic chemicals called dioxins. PVC products can leak harmful additives when disposed, and they release more dioxins and compounds containing chlorine when burned. Thus, PVCs are very difficult to recycle. Different chemicals are added to PVC’s to make them soft. Studies on laboratory animals demonstrate how these chemicals correlate with cancer and kidney damage, and may interfere with the reproductive system. Government and industry are doing their best to eliminate the use of PVCs. MAOB products contain NO PVCs.

Formaldehyde

Conventional mattresses are often pretreated with formaldehyde-emitting stain and water repellants whose manufacturing process releases Perfluorooctanoic Acid, PFOAs. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Formaldehyde is a colorless, foul smelling gas that can cause “watery eye, burning sensations in the eyes and throat, nausea, difficulty breathing and asthma attacks” if the exposure is high enough. Research shows that Formaldehyde is a carcinogen in animals, and there is evidence suggesting that formaldehyde may cause cancer in humans. MAOB products contain NO Formaldehyde. For more information, see: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/formalde.html.

PFOA (Perfluorooctanoic Acid)

Conventional mattresses are often pretreated with formaldehyde-emitting stain and water repellants whose manufacturing process releases Perfluorooctanoic Acid, PFOAs. The EPA has been investigating PFOA, also known as “C8″ because it:

-Is very persistent in the environment

-Is found at very low levels both in the environment and in the blood of the

general U.S. population

-Remains in people for a very long time

-Causes developmental and other adverse effects in laboratory animals

MAOB products contain NO PFOAs. For more information on PFOAs, see:http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/pfoa/

Carcinogenic Chemicals and Pesticides

In addition to being covered in toxic flame retardants, carcinogenic chemicals are key components of the manufacturing process for conventional, synthetic bedding. Synthetic latex is produced by chemical processes. It contains man-made materials such as polyurethane and other carcinogenic toxins such as formaldehyde or Polybrominated Diphenyl ethers (boric acid). These cancer-causing agents absorb into our bodies as we sleep, and are emitted into the air as the foam breaks down. Furthermore, synthetic manufacturers often use unregulated wool and cotton in their bedding.

The cotton industry heavily sprays the cotton plants with pesticides and herbicides to repel bugs. About 35% of the world’s pesticides are used to grow cotton. These pesticides create a residue that leaches and integrates into the fiber of the cotton. Because the pesticides become a part of the cotton, they can never wash out. These pesticides can then be absorbed by the human body through contact. See Pesticides Used on Conventional Cotton for a better understanding of how specific chemicals can affect you. MAOB only uses organic cotton, free of harmful pesticides, in our bedding.

Additionally, sheep are often dipped in insecticides to control external parasites such as ticks and lice. Prolonged exposure to sheep dip pesticides can adversely affect human health. According to the Organic Trade Association (http://www.ota.com/wool_environment.html):

-More than 14,000 pounds of insecticides were applied to sheep in the United States in 2000, the most recent year for which data is available (in the 22 states which have the highest sheep production). These pesticides are used to control mange, mites, lice, flies, and other pests. Some sheep and lambs receive multiple applications of several different chemicals.

-Pesticides used in sheep dips have consistently been linked with damage to the nervous system in workers that have been exposed to them in the United Kingdom. Even low-dose exposure over the long term has been conclusively linked with reduced nerve fiber function, anxiety, and depression. Long-term exposure to sheep dip has also been linked to reduced bone formation. In addition, residues of Diflubenzuron, an insecticide used in sheep dips, persist in the environment for more than a year.

-See Pesticides Used on Conventional Wool for more information on common pesticides used in conventional sheep rearing.

NO harmful chemicals or pesticides are used in organic bedding. MAOB uses organic cotton, organic wool, and organic latex in our organic bedding. No harmful, synthetic pesticides are used during crop cultivation, and no harmful chemicals are used in the manufacturing process.

Polyurethane Foam

According to the EPA, polyurethane foam is a widely used and highly effective insulator. “However, eye, skin and inhalation exposures to its key ingredients, Isocyanates, and other chemicals of concern in vapors, aerosols, and dusts can cause:

-Asthma, a potentially life-threatening disease

-Lung damage

-Respiratory problems and other breathing difficulties

-Skin and eye irritation

-Other potential adverse health effects”

Decreases Respiratory Health

Polyurethane foam and synthetic bedding have been linked to increased respiratory problems and other health issues. There are many research studies that correlate asthma with synthetic bedding and polyurethane foam. According to a study entitled, “Synthetic Bedding and Wheeze in Childhood”, published by Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, synthetic bedding was strongly and consistently associated with frequent childhood wheeze. The researchers note, “Substantial trends were evident for an association of increasing number of synthetic bedding items with frequent wheeze and with increasing wheeze frequency. Among children with asthma, the age of onset of asthma occurred earlier if synthetic bedding was used in infancy.” The complete study can be found here: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3703277.

According to, “The Association Between Synthetic Bedding and Adverse Respiratory Outcomes Among Skin-Prick Test Positive and Skin Prink Test Negative Children,” there was a strong association between synthetic bedding and adverse respiratory outcomes. Furthermore, a recent study by researchers at the University of Otago in Wellington, New Zealand found that synthetic bedding had higher levels of fungi-related Beta Glucan, which is found in house dust and is known to make respiratory conditions worse. The study concludes, “It is plausible that the increased use of synthetic bedding materials in New Zealand over the last two decades has added significantly to the allergen burden and thus to the severity of allergic asthma.” These two studies can be found at the following links respectively:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1034/j.1398-9995.2002.1s3234.x/full

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=1391797

Increases Exposure to Allergens

Every time you move, polyurethane foam compresses and as it expands to its original shape, it sucks in dust, old skin, bacteria, and moisture. Not only does polyurethane foam fail to resist moisture, leading to dust mites, mold and mildew, it also consists of an open cell honeycomb structure that provides the perfect living space for dust mites.

Quickly Degrades and Compresses

Synthetic mattresses containing the less expensive polyurethane will degrade and compress more quickly than mattresses containing 100% organic latex.

Devastating Environmental Impact

Conventional mattress production occurs with no concerns for the environment. Conventional cotton production has devastating environmental consequences. Runoff from nitrogen loaded synthetic fertilizers kills’ aquatic life and severely pollutes water. Pesticides used in conventional cotton production cause soil contamination and destroy animal habitats.

Conventional sheep facilities use insecticides to control external parasites and antibiotics to promote growth. According to the Organic Trade Association, “Pesticides used in sheep production can pose risks to human health and the environment. The top three insecticides used on sheep in 2005 -Fenvalerate, Malathion and Permethrin-are all slightly acutely toxic to humans, moderately to highly toxic to fish and amphibians, and suspect endocrine disruptors. Malathion is highly water soluble (can be easily transported from the application site by stormwater or irrigation water runoff) and the anaerobic half-life for Fenvalerate in soil is more than 155 days, potentially enabling it to cause groundwater contamination.”

Hazardous Production Process

Cotton fiber in conventional mattresses is processed with large amounts of boric acid (see Boric Acid under Pesticides Used on Cotton). Furthermore, conventional cotton production has a chlorine bleaching component that release carcinogenic dioxins. Most permanent press and stain and water repellant finishes can off gas formaldehyde (the manufacturing of these releases PFOA into the air). Synthetic latex is produced by chemical processes. It contains man-made materials such as polyurethane and other carcinogenic toxins such as formaldehyde or Polybrominated Diphenyl ethers (boric acid). These cancer-causing agents absorb into our bodies as we sleep, and are emitted into the air as the foam breaks down.

Organic Mattress References

Andrews, Wyatt. “Is Fire Retardant a Harmful Toxin? Exclusive: Scientists, Lawmakers Raise Red Flags About Fire-Retardant Compound In Everyday Goods.” www.cbsnews.com. N.p., 19 May 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

BBC News. “Pesticide Parkinson’s Link Strong .” BBC News 28 Mar. 2008: n. pag. BBC News Online. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Blum, Arlene, and Bruce Ames. “Flame-Retardant Additives as Possible Cancer Hazards.” Science 195 (Jan. 1977): n. pag. www.sciencemag.org. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Braun, David. “Why do we Sleep? Scientists are Still Trying to Find Out .” www.nationalgeographic.com . National Geographic, 26 Aug. 2009. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Clarkson, Aileen. “Organic Mattress Benefits.” www.ehow.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Crop Management Strategies Key to a Healthy Gulf, Planet.” www.newswise.com. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 21 Apr. 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Daily Products May be Harmful. CBS News. CBS, n.p., 21 May 2008. www.cbsnews.com . Web. Transcript. 15 Mar. 2011. .

EHP Online. “Semen Quality in Relation to Biomarkers of Pesticide Exposure.” Environmental Health Prespectives(Sept. 2003): n. pag. EHP. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Formaldehyde.” Environmental Protection Agency. N.p., 15 Feb. 2011. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. .

Gatenby, P., et al. “The Association between Synthetic Bedding and Adverse Respiratory Outcomes among Skin-Prick Test Positive and Skin-Prick Test Negative Children.” Allergy 57.3 (2002): 247-253. Wiley Online Library. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Glossary of Environmental Terms.” www.america.gov. N.p., 26 June 2009. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Johnson, Martin. “Asthma Alert on Synthetic Bedding.” http://www.nzherald.co.nz. The New Zealand Herald, 12 Apr. 2002. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Kaler, Dr. Bruce. “The Best Path to a Healthy Night’s Sleep.” www.ushealthworks.wordpress.com. N.p., 16 Feb. 2011. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Kay, Jane. “Dangerous Chemical Found in Women’s Breasts/?Bay Area Levels Higher than Europe, Japan.”www.sfgate.com . San Fransico Chronicle, 12 Mar. 2003. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Layton, Lyndsey. “Wal-Mart Bypasses Federal Regulators to Ban Controversial Flame Retardant.”www.washingtonpost.com . Washington Post, 26 Feb. 2011. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Organic Cotton Facts.” Organic Trade Association. N.p., June 2010. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) and Fluorinated Telomers.” U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. N.p., 17 Nov. 2010. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. .

“Polybrominated Diphenylethers (PBDEs).” www.epa.gov. N.p., 26 Jan. 2010. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).” www.epa.gov. N.p., 29 Dec. 2010. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Polyvinyl Chloride.” Green Peace International. N.p., 2011. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. .

Ponsonby, Anne-Louise, et al. “Synthetic Bedding and Wheeze in Childhood, .” Epidemiology 14 (Jan. 2003): 37-44.JSTOR. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Sayre, Laura. “Organic Farming Combats Global Warming Big Time.” www.rodaleinstitute.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Shaver, E.B. “Organic Mattress Facts.” www.ehow.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Stibich Ph.D, Mark. “Top 10 Health Benefits of a Good Night’s Sleep.” www.about.com. N.p., 8 May 2009. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Trevillian, Leigh F., et al. “Infant Sleeping Environment and Asthma at 7 Years: A Prospective Cohort Study.”http://ajph.aphapublications.org. American Journal of Public Health, Dec. 2005. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Turner, Ginny. “Organic Bedrooms and Effects on Your Health.” www.worldwidehealth.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

USGS. “Pesticides in the Nation’s Streams and Ground Water, 1992–2001.” USGS Circular 1291 (Feb. 2007): n. pag.USGS. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Webster, Paul. “Exposure to Flame Retardants On the Rise.” Science 304 (June 2004): n. pag. www.sciencemag.org. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Why Wool?” Woolipedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Wool and the Environment.” www.ota.com. Organic Trade Association, n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Research

Andrews, Wyatt. “Is Fire Retardant a Harmful Toxin? Exclusive: Scientists, Lawmakers Raise Red Flags About Fire-Retardant Compound In Everyday Goods.” www.cbsnews.com. N.p., 19 May 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

BBC News. “Pesticide Parkinson’s Link Strong .” BBC News 28 Mar. 2008: n. pag. BBC News Online. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Blum, Arlene, and Bruce Ames. “Flame-Retardant Additives as Possible Cancer Hazards.” Science 195 (Jan. 1977): n. pag. www.sciencemag.org. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Braun, David. “Why do we Sleep? Scientists are Still Trying to Find Out .” www.nationalgeographic.com . National Geographic, 26 Aug. 2009. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Clarkson, Aileen. “Organic Mattress Benefits.” www.ehow.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Crop Management Strategies Key to a Healthy Gulf, Planet.” www.newswise.com. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 21 Apr. 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Daily Products May be Harmful. CBS News. CBS, n.p., 21 May 2008. www.cbsnews.com . Web. Transcript. 15 Mar. 2011. .

EHP Online. “Semen Quality in Relation to Biomarkers of Pesticide Exposure.” Environmental Health Prespectives(Sept. 2003): n. pag. EHP. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Formaldehyde.” Environmental Protection Agency. N.p., 15 Feb. 2011. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. .

Gatenby, P., et al. “The Association between Synthetic Bedding and Adverse Respiratory Outcomes among Skin-Prick Test Positive and Skin-Prick Test Negative Children.” Allergy 57.3 (2002): 247-253. Wiley Online Library. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Glossary of Environmental Terms.” www.america.gov. N.p., 26 June 2009. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Johnson, Martin. “Asthma Alert on Synthetic Bedding.” http://www.nzherald.co.nz. The New Zealand Herald, 12 Apr. 2002. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Kaler, Dr. Bruce. “The Best Path to a Healthy Night’s Sleep.” www.ushealthworks.wordpress.com. N.p., 16 Feb. 2011. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Kay, Jane. “Dangerous Chemical Found in Women’s Breasts/?Bay Area Levels Higher than Europe, Japan.”www.sfgate.com . San Fransico Chronicle, 12 Mar. 2003. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Layton, Lyndsey. “Wal-Mart Bypasses Federal Regulators to Ban Controversial Flame Retardant.”www.washingtonpost.com . Washington Post, 26 Feb. 2011. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Organic Cotton Facts.” Organic Trade Association. N.p., June 2010. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) and Fluorinated Telomers.” U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. N.p., 17 Nov. 2010. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. .

“Polybrominated Diphenylethers (PBDEs).” www.epa.gov. N.p., 26 Jan. 2010. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).” www.epa.gov. N.p., 29 Dec. 2010. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Polyvinyl Chloride.” Green Peace International. N.p., 2011. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. .

Ponsonby, Anne-Louise, et al. “Synthetic Bedding and Wheeze in Childhood, .” Epidemiology 14 (Jan. 2003): 37-44.JSTOR. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Sayre, Laura. “Organic Farming Combats Global Warming Big Time.” www.rodaleinstitute.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Shaver, E.B. “Organic Mattress Facts.” www.ehow.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Stibich Ph.D, Mark. “Top 10 Health Benefits of a Good Night’s Sleep.” www.about.com. N.p., 8 May 2009. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Trevillian, Leigh F., et al. “Infant Sleeping Environment and Asthma at 7 Years: A Prospective Cohort Study.”http://ajph.aphapublications.org. American Journal of Public Health, Dec. 2005. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Turner, Ginny. “Organic Bedrooms and Effects on Your Health.” www.worldwidehealth.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

USGS. “Pesticides in the Nation’s Streams and Ground Water, 1992–2001.” USGS Circular 1291 (Feb. 2007): n. pag.USGS. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

Webster, Paul. “Exposure to Flame Retardants On the Rise.” Science 304 (June 2004): n. pag. www.sciencemag.org. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Why Wool?” Woolipedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. .

“Wool and the Environment.” www.ota.com. Organic Trade Association, n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011.

 HOURS

 
     

Monday

CLOSED

Tuesday

10:00AM - 5:00PM

Wednesday

10:00AM - 4:00PM

Thursday

10:00AM - 4:00PM

Friday

10:00AM - 5:00PM

Saturday

10:00AM - 5:00PM

Sunday

CLOSED

     
     
     

 

CONTACT US

/ keep in touch

Mountain Air Organic Beds

1106 N Old Missouri Road,

Springdale, AR 72764

Phone. 844-223-2263

Email. naturalbeds@gmail.com